Register or Sign in        Email This Page     Link To This Page    
Visit MND at MBA in NYC!
28,899
# of Forum Posts
 

Send Article via Email

REGISTERED USERS (Free!):
Can forward to 6 email addresses at a time. Register or Login

Registered users also get the additional advantage of Co-branded Emails and Landing Pages. Learn more about these features.

Your Name: 
Your Email: 
I want to forward this to
(Enter Email Address Below) :
Include a Personal Message (optional)

Please add 4 and 8 and type the answer here:
Leave this field blank.
Email Preview Below:
This feature is now 100% free. Learn More About Co-branded Email and our other Co-branded Services.
 
This email was sent to you by:
Harry Chriest |
Mortgage News Daily

Message:   YOUR MESSAGE HERE
Email alerts, such as this one, are a free service provided by Mortgage News Daily. If you would like to receive an alert when important news breaks please register to join our community.
The Week Ahead: Sparse Economic Data Leaves Focus on Auctions, Tradeflows
Posted to: MBS Commentary
Monday, January 07, 2013 7:05 AM

Forward this email:  Send a copy of this story to someone you know that may want to read it.

We use the term "tradeflows" somewhat loosely to refer to the broader phenomenon of market participants opening and closing long or short positions.  For example, an insurance fund or large asset management firm might have opened a new "short position" as rates began rising.  When rates break through a certain target and then fall back below that target, the account with the short position would then "cover" or buy back the bonds they sold short when rates were lower.  In this sense, "short-covering" is "profit-taking."  This is one way that tradeflows can step in to stop a sell-off.

Another way is when new "long positions" are taken out by market participants with cash that they'd like to put to work.  Those accounts may be waiting for similar price and/or yield levels before deciding it's time to take out a new long position in the hope that rates will fall (or prices will rise).  Eventually, such long positions would be closed out when prices reached the investor's target, or rather, when they hit the target and then fell to a stop-loss level.  

In other words, if you bought something for $100, hoping for prices to rise to $110, you might not necessarily sell it immediately at $110, especially if it's next move is to $111!  But with each move higher from the target, most traders will have some form of a "stop-loss" in place in order to minimize losses from prices moving against them, but while still staying flexible enough to capitalize on additional gains past their target.  

The preceding are two examples of tradeflows.  They exist in all markets and aren't only important for the traders who are actually opening and closing their own positions, but also for every other trader interested in a particular market to observe and get a sense of what's moving money!  Tradeflows themselves can be the result of preferences, assumptions, insights, ideas, and goals on the part of human beings.  They can be the result of necessity, balance-sheet constraints, legal issues, portfolio allocations, and liquidity needs on the part of large firms.  Or they an be the result of technical and algorithmic trading that seeks to capitalize on trends, continuation/reversal signals, and even complex systems that consider other market levels and news headlines.

Bottom line, "tradeflow" is a catch-all term that references everything happening "behind the scenes" in the trading world.  For example, seeing MBS Prices or 10yr Yields move a certain amount of 32nds or basis points is something that we can observe on this site.  But there are so many reasons those moves could be taking place, and while those reasons are occasionally easy to see, other times they could be the result of certain types of accounts closing or opening certain positions with other account types adjusting their own positions in response.  That's not the kind of information that can be conveyed with a simple "+0-04."  

Getting back to the headline...

The week ahead is limited in terms of economic data and events, and while the Treaasury Auction cycle will provide some guidance for bond markets, the first significant auction isn't until Wednesday.  On that same note, the small amount of economic data doesn't offer a meaningful report until Thursday!  As such, tradeflows will be a big consideration for the first day or two with auctions and data coming into more focus on the last 3 days of the week.  10yr yields will be attempting to bounce back from daily closing highs in the mid 1.91's after hitting intraday highs of 1.961 on Friday.  The equivalent mark for MBS is 104-00 in Fannie 3.0s (based on January MBS.  February prices are lower and will take over on Friday morning).

MBS Live Econ Calendar:

Week Of Mon, Jan 7 2012 - Fri, Jan 11 2012

Time

Event

Period

Unit

Forecast

Prior

Mon, Jan 7

--

No Significant Scheduled Data

--

--

--

--

Tue, Jan 8

13:00

3-Yr Note Auction

--

bl

32.0

--

15:00

Consumer credit

Nov

bl

11.25

14.20

Wed, Jan 9

13:00

10yr Treasury Auction

--

bl

21.0

--

Thu, Jan 10

08:30

Initial Jobless Claims

--

k

365

372

10:00

Wholesale Inventories

Nove

%

+0.3

+0.6

13:00

30-Yr Treasury Auction

--

bl

13.0

--

Fri, Jan 11

08:30

Import/Export prices mm

Dec

%

.1 / 0.0

-0.9 / -0.7

08:30

International Trade

Nov

bl

-41.3

-42.24

* mm: monthly | yy: annual | qq: quarterly | "w/e" in "period" column indicates a weekly report

* Q1: First Quarter | Adv: Advance Release | Pre: Preliminary Release | Fin: Final Release

* (n)SA: (non) Seasonally Adjusted

* PMI: "Purchasing Managers Index"




More from MND:

 

If you would like to opt-out of receiving email forwards from this person please click here to remove your email address.

Forward this email:  Send a copy of this story to someone you know that may want to read it.

 

More From MND

Mortgage Rates:
  • 30 Yr FRM 3.82%
  • |
  • 15 Yr FRM 3.11%
  • |
  • Jumbo 30 Year Fixed 3.69%
MBS Prices:
Recent Housing Data:
  • Mortgage Apps 4.93%
  • |
  • Refinance Index 0.90%
  • |
  • FHFA Home Price Index 0.67%